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Sintesi dell'editore

A stunning account of how the American military's breaking of the Japanese diplomatic Purple codes led to the defeat of Nazi Germany.

Bruce Lee, having had access to more than one million pages of US Army documents and thousands of pages of daily top-secret messages dispatched to Tokyo from the Japanese embassy in Berlin, assembles fascinating revelations about pivotal moments in the war, including the reason Eisenhower stopped his army at the Elbe and let the Russians capture Berlin, the invasion of Europe, and the battles on the African and Eastern fronts.

This groundbreaking book clearly demonstrates how the success of the American code breakers led to so many favorable military and strategic outcomes for the Allies and hastened the end of this devastating war.

©2015 Bruce Lee (P)2016 Dreamscape Media, LLC

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  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Ken
  • 07/08/2017

Powerful

The one work essential to understanding what information the allied leaders had that influenced the most important decisions of wwii.

1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • Generale
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    3 out of 5 stars
  • DLKFC
  • 29/04/2022

Author's rhetoric needs to be toned down

This is a very interesting and important subject. However, the author writes as though every historian who has previously written on this topic is a fool. He speaks very disrespectfully of other historians as well as many historical figures who were actually involved in the decrypting work (just as one example, he describes one decoder's skills as "being adequate only for reading smoke signals). In addition, he never tires of telling us how many, many documents he has read. It makes it very difficult to take the book seriously as it often sounds more like a pompous screed. The subject is interesting, the performance is good, but the author needs to tone down his rhetoric