The Chimes

A Goblin Story of Some Bells That Rang an Old Year Out and a New Year In
Letto da: Steven Crossley
Durata: 3 ore e 42 min
5 out of 5 stars (1 recensione)
Dopo 30 giorni EUR 9,99/mese

Sintesi dell'editore

In the 1840s Charles Dickens wrote five short stories with strong social and moral messages. "The Chimes: A Goblin Story of Some Bells that Rang an Old Year Out and a New Year In" is the second of these stories, whose predecessor was the famous "A Christmas Carol". "The Chimes" focuses on Trotty, a poor elderly messenger who is filled with gloom over reports of crime and immorality in the newspapers. After losing faith in society, Trotty follows a call to the church bell tower, where he encounters goblins that teach him - and listeners - lessons in the form of visions about the mistreatment of the lower class in society. This story of social awakening inspires listeners to treat everyone with fair kindness.

Public Domain (P)2016 Dreamscape Media, LLC

"Narrator Steven Crossley deftly transports listeners to 1844 for this second in Dickens's Christmas series.... Crossley cleverly combines the tones of a fairy tale and a horror story." ( AudioFile)

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  • 15/11/2016

Rather obscure.

There is a good reason that of the short stories that were written by Charles Dickens, Christmas Carol is the best known. This little tale is much less appealing, though it has some plot devices in common, namely old man has visions of a potential future. It's rather the literary equivalent of eating chaff. Dry and a little indigestible.