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Sintesi dell'editore

Based on exclusive interviews with key participants, including Caspar Weinberger, George Schultz, John Poindexter, Robert McFarlane, and William Clark, Victory chronicles why and how Ronald Reagan helped to bring down the Soviet Union.  

In this explosive book, Peter Schweizer provides the riveting details of how the Reagan inner circle undermined the Soviet economy and its dwindling resource base and subverted the Kremlin's hold on its global empire. Using secret diplomacy, the administration dramatically reduced Soviet income while at the same time driving Moscow to expend an increasing amount of precious assets. On another level, there was an American initiative to provide covert aid to indigenous forces in Poland and Afghanistan to roll back Soviet power. Schweizer's compelling and convincing argument on the Reagan administration's calculated strategy is impossible to ignore. 

©1994 Peter Scheizer (P)1997 Blackstone Audiobooks

"[A] convincing, startling expose that reads like a spy thriller." (Publishers Weekly)

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  • Generale
    4 out of 5 stars
  • uuilly
  • 17/01/2006

More about Bill Casey than Reagan

Good book. Describes the details of the economic warfare waged against the USSR. It is also interesting to see how we forged a much stronger relationship with Saudi Arabia (for better or for worse) to hasten the collapse of the USSR. Really this is more of a story about Bill Casey than Reagan, but no matter. The narrator isn't the best, but he's not the worst, and the author can be a bit repetetive.

6 people found this helpful

  • Generale
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    4 out of 5 stars
  • John
  • 14/12/2011

interesting details of the Cold War

There are many things I liked about "Victory." I liked the overall theme that Reagan and the other Cold Warriors brought down the USSR through their efforts. This is refreshing to hear since left-wing revisionists give the credit to Gorbachev.

I enjoyed hearing details of what the USA was doing in Poland and Afghanistan in the 1980's. Even though I had read quite a bit about both theaters, I was unaware of some of the interesting details that Mr. Schweizer has included. Also, I gained a better understanding of the basis for the friendship between the American government and the Saudi royal family.

The only bits that I had trouble with were the calculations of how much the USSR lost and Saudi Arabia gained from the decrease in the value of the dollar in the mid-1980's. I think the author was bending mathematical logic.

John Christmas, author of "Democracy Society"

1 person found this helpful

  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Andy
  • 21/09/2008

Amazing "Victory"

Victory is an extraordinary story. It seems to be incredibly well researched and documented. It maintains a compelling narrative and it is very well read. It was a wonderful eye opener for a die hard liberal who hated Reagan.

2 people found this helpful

  • Generale
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    2 out of 5 stars
  • David Webb
  • 18/01/2021

Politics, what more could I say, nothin'

This just reinforced what I had already knew and realized that what is spoon fed and given to the public through the main stream media/social and public domain periodicals it's only a very small portion of what they are showing and telling the public. I personally believe a majority of what's given to the public over half of it is spun or added too or there's hardly any factual truth to it whatsoever. ALWAYS keep in mind, main stream media today, unlike in the past, it's ALL about ratings. In other words, "They" have to get people to watch, and at the same time keep those people interested, and coming back, and also going out to tell others what, and where they heard their information they discuss with others. It all factors in to how many are gullible enough to be watching or listening, and actually believing these total complete strangers that are meant to be or people are led and taught/trained subconsciously to be led to believe that what the media is giving to the public, well, it's true, it's pertinent information and knowledge that, well, we all need to know about, absolutely, "believes the gullible ones". What's the difference between the total complete stranger that you so freely and easily give your blind trust and attention too on television, and the man or the woman you meet at the supermarket that also gives his take or advice on things on whether their true or not?? Well of course those people on television we're led and taught/trained to believe that, well, these individuals are "experts".

Enough Truth rambling, so if you get the gist of all I've just said this book here pretty much as well for me, just like I mentioned that we so freely do and I'm doing by listening and not necessarily taking most of it to heart that what was told to me, there's a little, just a little truth in it all, probably, I say "probably" with a bit of hesitation.

What I found so fascinating the most, actually the only thing I found fascinating about it was what you don't hear from the media, personal relationships between foreign and domestic officials and how everything falls into place due to those relationships and of course what we're told and "suppose to believe" about Reagans and his administrations "Victory" and their secret strategy that hastened the collapse of the Soviet Union. Would I look at it at all or any of it as truth, well, my rule when it comes to "politics, the devils lair" my answer would be, NO, I just take it ALL with a "grain of salt". Just going with the fascination and the amusement of it all really, and did this book do that for me? Well, in some parts, which wasn't much really, yes, but the majority of it all, no. Would this be a book that interested me enough to go back to and listen to again (listened to it on Audible), absolutely not! It's worth a one time listen, definitely! Would I have enjoyed sitting down and reading this book, no way!! There's no way I would've been that amused to actually finish it all by sitting down and reading it. Keep in mind, it probably took me, I would say maybe 8ish times to leave and keep coming back to it, it was alright/ O.K.. Nothing amusing to bring up as a conversation starter with someone in what I had just finished listening too recently, nah, not at all.

*Posted on "goodreads"

  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • E. J. Potchen
  • 12/06/2016

Winning a war without bloodshed!

You For most of my early years the end of the Cold War was nowhere in sight. There were many peripheral battles which were considerably more than scrimmages. eg. Korea and Vietnam. Indeed the Cold War was a series of hot wars until economic war fare matured. This is the story of how it was done.
Although I lived through the time and was alert to the daily news I missed many of the nuances that are well explained in this book. The available of sources and writing skill of the author have provided a highly entertaining read. I strongly recommend it to anyone who wants to learn about what they think they already know,
"The biggest barrier to learning is believing that you already know the answer." This book helped me through that phase of ignorance about this important subject of modern history.