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The Zimmermann Telegram copertina

The Zimmermann Telegram

Di: Barbara W. Tuchman
Letto da: Wanda McCaddon
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Sintesi dell'editore

In the dark winter of 1917, as World War I was deadlocked, Britain knew that Europe could be saved only if the United States joined the war. But President Wilson remained unshakable in his neutrality. Then, with a single stroke, the tool to propel America into the war came into a quiet British office. One of countless messages intercepted by the crack team of British decoders, the Zimmermann telegram was a top-secret message from Berlin inviting Mexico to join Japan in an invasion of the United States. Mexico would recover her lost American territories while keeping the U.S. occupied on her side of the Atlantic.

How Britain managed to inform America of Germany's plan without revealing that the German codes had been broken makes for an incredible, true story of espionage, intrigue, and international politics, as only Barbara W. Tuchman could tell it.

©1958 Barbara W. Tuchman (P)2010 Blackstone Audio, Inc.
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  • Categorie: Storia

“A true, lucid thriller…. Mrs. Tuchman makes the most of it with a creative writer’s sense of drama and a scholar’s obeisance to the evidence.” ( New York Times)
“The tale has most of the ingredients of an Eric Ambler spy thriller.” ( Saturday Review)

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  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
Immagine del profilo di Mike From Mesa
  • Mike From Mesa
  • 09/09/2012

US entry to World War I

I first heard about the Zimmerman Telegram a long time ago when in High School taking a U.S. History class. The telegram was mentioned as the reason the U.S. entered World War I, but we were also told that there was a common view that the telegram was actually a British hoax designed to draw the U.S. into the war. I remember thinking that I wanted to know more about what happened and the validity of the telegram.

Years later, when I started to actually read history for pleasure, I found that World War II consumed most of my interest in twentieth century history and I never actually got around to reading anything about the telegram. Thus, when I saw Barbara Tuchman's book on sale on Audible, I bought it thinking that finally I would find out what it was all about. I was not expecting too much, but was very pleasantly surprised.

Most of this book is concerned with the events leading up to the sending of the Zimmerman Telegram and reveals a part of U.S. history that I knew very little about. The tensions between Mexico and the United States prior to World War I are reasonably well known (for example, General Pershing's assignment to track down Pancho Villa) although the details seem to have been cast into the shadows by the U. S. efforts to first keep out of World War I and then by its actions as a participant. This prelude to U.S. entry is so interesting that I find it surprising that it was not covered in detail in the history classes I took in High School or College.

I have read several of Ms. Tuchman's books (The Proud Tower, A Distant Mirror, The Guns of August, Stillwell and the American Experience in China, The March of Folly) but until I read this book I never sensed any humor or sense of irony in her writing. While the events leading up to the sending of the Zimmerman Telegram were serious and involved Germany's efforts to get the United States involved in enough trouble to keep it from arming the Allies, a description of those events and the Wilson Administration's reactions to them sound more like a script from a Max Sennet comedy than the actions of a deliberative and serious government. Those who think highly of the Woodrow Wilson’s handling of domestic and international affairs might find this book at odds with that view.

Ms. McCaddon’s reading of this book is first class. Her narration fairly bristles with Ms. Tuchman’s sense of the absurd and the events are so interesting as to leave one wondering why much of this was not presented as a basic part of U. S. history. This is doubly so because it is clear that many of the views described prior to the release of the Zimmerman Telegram are representative of the American view of Japan during the first half of the twentieth century and make it easier to understand the U.S. reaction to Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor 25 years later.

I recommend this book without hesitation to anyone who has any interest in the events leading up to the start of U.S. participation in World War I or, for that matter, to anyone with an interest in U.S. – Mexican or U.S.-Japanese relations in the twentieth century.

49 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
Immagine del profilo di Carolyn
  • Carolyn
  • 17/01/2013

Very Interesting

Before I found this book, I'd never heard of the Zimmerman telegram. Being Canadian, we never went into great detail on why the Americans entered the First World War - we were involved once Britain was involved. However, once I listened to other Barbara W. Tuchman books (The Proud Tower and The Guns of August), I knew I had to listen to this one too, and it didn't disappoint me.

Although this is not a particularly long audiobook, especially in the realm of nonfiction, that doesn't mean it isn't detailed. In fact, it gives practically a day-by-day account of some of the most critical periods and plenty of background to understand who the players are and what their motivations were. It is fascinating to listen to and it gives you a really good sense of the state of the world in early 1917 - the Germans moving to unrestricted submarine warfare, the French running out of energy, the British running out of money, the Mexicans caught in a series of coups, the Americans failing to understand why no one would agree to a negotiated peace. All of the backroom negotiations, intelligence operations, and diplomatic unease made for a really engaging story. And although you know from the start that the Americans will get involved, somehow there is still a sense of suspense in the telling where you wonder whether Mexico will attack Texas and the Germans will win in Europe after all.

The narration in this book by Wanda McCaddon was excellent. She can pronounce all of the foreign-language words (primarily German and Spanish) well, one of my personal irks with a lot of audiobook narrators, and in general reads at a good pace with great voice changes to represent individual speakers.

Filled with information from diaries and official records, this book makes you feel like you know the people involved well and that you understand why they are making the decisions they are. For such a small incident, really, in the overall view of the war, it makes for an interesting story with far-reaching consequences that affect how the world is today. Although I don't have a huge interest in American history, this was so much more than just a story about how they came into the First World War. It's about Germany, Britain, Mexico just as much as it is about the US, and Tuchman does a great job of showing the events from all those perspectives. I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in WWI history, Woodrow Wilson, and/or stories of diplomatic intrigue.

36 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • Generale
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
Immagine del profilo di David
  • David
  • 02/12/2012

How the U.S. entered the war

I listened to this book because I have kind of an interest in cryptography and its historical impact. The Zimmerman Telegram is ostensibly about the famous telegram that was the final straw that brought America into the first World War, and how the British decoded it and then made use of it. But that turns out to be only a relatively minor part of the story. Really, most of the book is about the geopolitics of the early 20th century and the personalities of leading American, British, and German officials, diplomats, and military leaders, and how these shaped history as we know it.

The "plot" in a nutshell (and Barbara Tuchman does make this book interesting enough that it reads more like a novel plot moving from one twist to another, rather than the inevitable course of history): in 1917, Britain and the other Allied powers are getting the stuffing beaten out of them by Germany. The European front is hemorrhaging lives. What Britain wants and needs, and what Germany fears, is America entering the war. The only thing keeping Britain alive is her navy, and the German navy thinks they can starve Britain and the rest of the Allies if they commence "unrestricted" submarine warfare: meaning, even neutral ships are fair targets in the war zone. Since this largely means American ships bringing supplies to Britain, letting the U-boats loose means very likely provoking America into declaring war.

Then falls into the hands of British codebreakers, who unbeknownst to the Germans have broken their diplomatic code, a telegram from German Foreign Secretary Arthur Zimmerman to the German ambassador in Mexico. Zimmerman tells the ambassador to offer an alliance between Germany and Mexico should the U.S. enter the war (which they expect will happen since the decision has already been made to begin unrestricted submarine warfare). As part of the deal, Germany offers Mexico a great big slice of the American Southwest (basically everything the U.S. had taken from Mexico in various wars and then some), and also urges them to make an alliance with Japan to get Japan to attack the U.S. West Coast.

This is obviously political dynamite, and the British figure it's just what they need to push the U.S. into declaring war on Germany. The only problems are (1) how to reveal this in a way that will simultaneously not be dismissed by the Americans as a hoax while not revealing to the Germans that their code has been broken; (2) U.S. President Woodrow Wilson, who has been stubbornly persisting in trying to broker peace and keep the U.S. neutral, even as it becomes increasingly obvious that neither will be possible.

As I mentioned, the codebreaking stuff turns out to be a very small piece of the story. I found the characterization of President Wilson much more interesting: at times he seems naive, foolish, stubborn, and understandably his opponents even labeled him cowardly. He was adamantly opposed to entering the war, and was pushing his "peace without victory" plan even after the Germans had all but spit on it. But Tuchman's portrayal does suggest a man who was far from cowardly, and not a fool either. He genuinely wanted peace, and genuinely grieved when his orders resulted in the deaths of American servicemembers. (One might wish some of our more recent Presidents had such a personal investment in the consequences of their orders...) But he was also stubborn and prone to not listening to news and opinions he didn't like.

The other interesting part of the story is just how differently the U.S. was situated then as opposed to now. We Americans tend to think that the U.S. has been a "world power" pretty much since its founding, but really, in 1917, the U.S. was big and had a lot of industrial capacity and manpower, but had yet to really be tested on the world stage. Today we laugh at the idea that Mexico might seriously think they could invade the U.S. and carve off Texas, Arizona, and New Mexico, but it was no joke then, especially if Japan, a growing empire itself, landed troops on the West Coast, which was also a real possibility, or at least the U.S. believed it was.

World War I was when America had to actually prove itself and get bloodied. The other powers wanted America's strength on their side and feared America's strength turned against them, but probably no one had any idea of the global superpower the U.S. would become.

An interesting history full of diplomatic maneuverings and historical context that reminds us that everything leading up to World War I, like most wars, was built on things that had been happening for decades before it. A hundred years later, we mostly only remember the outcome.

30 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • Generale
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
Immagine del profilo di Howie
  • Howie
  • 23/01/2012

Very interesting and reads like a novel....

The intrigue of how the US ended up in WWI, despite Wilson's isolationist stance. Found it entertaining as well, read like spy fiction.

10 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • Generale
    4 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
Immagine del profilo di Audible Listener
  • Audible Listener
  • 30/04/2012

Poor sound quality

Any additional comments?

In format 3, this was very difficult to listen to. I had to increase volume well over that used for playing other books I have downloaded from Audible, and even at that volume words were sometimes unintelligible.

8 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • Generale
    4 out of 5 stars
Immagine del profilo di David
  • David
  • 04/08/2011

My first audiobook

Interesting, informative account of the events and circumstances leading to US decision to enter WWI. The reading was well done at a comfortable pace. I had difficulty with keeping track of all the characters (German, English, American, etc). I suspect that I need to see the names on the page to better remember their role in the story, but this did not distract from understanding and appreciating the story.

6 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
Immagine del profilo di Flatbroke
  • Flatbroke
  • 24/12/2012

Stunning look at a forgotten piece of history

Any additional comments?

Not as well known as other books by Barbara Tuchman, the Zimmermann Telegram covers an astounding piece of WWI history. The British codebreakers deserve their recognition, but so do the ingenious methods of the British govt to find a way to release the info without compromising the secrecy of the codebreaking. The obstinacy of President Wilson and his insistence on doing things his way comes into sharp focus. In order to conduct diplomatic negotiations, he allowed the Germans to send messages via the State Dept. Against the council of his own officials, Wilson allowed the Germans to send their messages CODED, never dreaming that they would abuse the privilege. When he found out that the Germans were plotting against the U.S. simultaneously, his anger against them was intractable. The plan sounded crazy: worried that the newly implemented policy of unrestricted u boat warfare might bring the U.S. into the war, the Germans decided to negotiate with Mexico (and Japan) to attack the U.S. in exchange for Texas, Arizona, and New Mexico. When the contents of the telegram were released, there was some debate as to whether it was genuine. Instead of denying it and possibly delaying U.S. action with the concern it was a fake, foreign secreatry Zimmermann, the author of the telegram, confirmed its veracity with the justification that it was a proposal in case the U.S. declared war. It is a fascinating story from start to end.

5 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
Immagine del profilo di john
  • john
  • 29/11/2011

US manoevered into World War 1

An outstanding history of a key event leading to US participation in World War 1. What you would expect from a thoroughly researched Barbara Tuchman book. Solid on facts and read in a most interesting way. Once you plug in you don't want to stop until you have heard the whole book.

5 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • Generale
    3 out of 5 stars
Immagine del profilo di Matt
  • Matt
  • 29/11/2010

Interesting and boring at the same time.

Interesting story presented in a fairly boring fashion. While the overall arc of what was happening is interesting, it's boringly written and read.

5 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • Generale
    4 out of 5 stars
Immagine del profilo di Makhanitis
  • Makhanitis
  • 10/07/2010

Back story to the infamos telegram...

The sound is fair, takes some getting used to. Most people are aware of how the first world war got started, monarch is killed by a nationalist. Few know how the US got drawn into the war, was it the sinking of merchant ships, black operations in part of Germany, or a telegram... like most serious problems in the world it was most likely due to several reasons rather than just one. This book deals mainly with mainly one yet still shows the relevance of the others...

5 persone l'hanno trovata utile

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  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
Immagine del profilo di North Yorkshire
  • North Yorkshire
  • 16/08/2022

Still supremely entertaining

Written nearly 70 years ago (1958) this account of the Zimmerman telegram and America's entry into World War I is still a lively and entertaining account. It mainly focuses on Germany's attempts to manoeuvring for advantage, keeping America out of the war for long enough for its U-Boats to fore the British to surrender. That manoeuvring is like a strategy board game, factoring in Japan, Mexico, as well as German diplomats in Russia and American diplomats in Berlin. We see British code-breakers (part of 'Room 40'), meetings of the German high command, British printshop owners in Mexico, and Mexican revolutionaries (including Pancho Villa), It is lively, tightly focused and reads (hears?) a bit like a novel.

I thought the narrator was excellent, thoroughly getting into the role. She captured the author's scathing view of the American side (Wilson's idealism is savaged) and Prussian arrogance and high-handedness. She also catches the humour and overall vitality of what is a classic work of popular history.

Tuchman tells a human story - about decision-makers agonising with impossible problems and then, self-consciously, plumping from a list of likely blunders, She provides sharp pen-portraits of the main protagonists - and is fairly unusual in including several Germans in this (rather than just isolating the Kaiser and Ludendorff). The exception is Japan, which was widely incorporated in plans, but whose own perspective is never addressed.

I listened to this only because it was on the Plus list, but I had read some of Tuchman's books before and knew she was a skilful narrator. Her investigations (perhaps a better word than research for this popular study of the 50s) seems to have been thorough and it captured my interest from the start.

  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
Immagine del profilo di R J Elliott
  • R J Elliott
  • 12/11/2021

terrific

Excellent telling of a fascinating story, learned a lot in a most enjoyable way. Cheers.

  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
Immagine del profilo di Asta Rootsi
  • Asta Rootsi
  • 10/09/2021

Brilliant story brilliantly performed

This book definitely shows that truth can be stranger than fiction. And the narrator does an amazing job with an amazingly witty and entertaining text. Definitely history at its best and narration at its best as well!

  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
Immagine del profilo di PureAFM
  • PureAFM
  • 01/09/2021

Plesantly surprised

This was not quite what I expected but I ended up really enjoying it. the start is a little weaker than the rest. it covers a lot about the perspective of the relations of the Germans, Americans and Mexicans which is a perspective I see much less off. It becomes the stories of the characters involved in Germanies attempt to start war with Mexico and America from both sides, supprisingly dramatic given that it's historically accurate.