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Sintesi dell'editore

Get ready for a rousing rebel yell as best-selling author H. W. Crocker III charges through bunkers and battlefields in The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Civil War. Crocker busts myths and shatters stereotypes as he profiles eminent and colorful military generals, revealing little-known truths, like why Robert E. Lee had a higher regard for African-Americans than Lincoln did. Crocker culminates his tome in the most politically incorrect chapter of all: "What If the South Had Won." This is the "P.I." Guide that every Civil War buff and Southern partisan will want on their bookshelf, in their classroom, and under their Christmas tree.
©2008 H. W. Crocker III (P)2008 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

Cosa pensano gli ascoltatori di The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Civil War

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  • Generale
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 11/09/2020

Biased, Opinionated, Unilateral, & Naive

Crocker states that General Nathan Bedford Forrest had slaves begging him to take them in as slaves in antebellum times, and Crocker goes on to claim, therefore, that the Southern slave owners took care of them all, just like Forrest and Lee. So because two slave owners were decent, thus all of them were? Really? And anyone can look up autobiographies of escaped slaves and read up about their abuse and suffering. Crocker avoids pointing out that the Confederates were supposed to exchange POWs with the Union, called paroles, and not supposed to release their received paroles to the battlefield, but broke the agreement with the Union, since the Union encountered the same POWs on multiple occasions; thus, the Union ceased the paroling. Crocker saliently worships the South, using high praises for all the states, politicians, and people themselves of the Southern region. Love for one’s land is fine, but it borders on neglecting any wrongdoing. He stresses that through Christian faith the southern states were going to free the slaves on their own, if it weren’t for the pestering and harassment of the abolitionists, which is just logically paradoxical. He equates Lincoln to King George III; even calls him a dictator. You get the impression that Crocker would hail John Wilkes Booth as a martyr and a saint. It’s obvious that there was an ulterior agenda in writing this book. When I read the title “Politically Incorrect,” I presumed this book would offer rarely read information, and it provided a few trivial notes, like Lee hiding under a log from a few Mexican soldiers during the Mexican war, but it’s clear as day that the author perceived the South of being innocent of any wrongdoing (even neglecting to mention the Reverse Underground Railroad, where freed people were illegally forced back into the slave trade). I can agree that not everyone in the Union were innocent: Sherman was a racist, Grant was a drunken anti-Semite, and McClellan was a useless, incompetent coward. But if you want an unbiased, impartial book on the Civil War, then seek elsewhere, because this is incredibly one-sided to the point of being irritating. Myself being a completionist and wanting to keep an open mind, I forced myself to finish it, which was no easy feat. If I have to hear him use the phrase “was gone with the wind” one more time from this book, I’m gonna snap.

25 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • JLK
  • 23/06/2021

Very eye opening information contained in this boo

Very eye opening information contained in this book. It's an old addage that the history is written by the Victor's. This book is an attestatament to this exact issue and does a great job of presenting All the facts in order so there is no mistaking the conclusions it arrives at. The amount of journals and letters that are in existence from this war is enormous and when laid out in order is clear that we are being lied to about why this war happened. The civil war really marked the end of the founding fathers ideals in this country. No wonder why we are in this mess we find ourselves in the 2020's if your origin story is built on a lie of omission everything will be a lie from that point forward.

7 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • Generale
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    2 out of 5 stars
  • James E. Thornburg
  • 19/09/2020

Confederate propaganda pure and simple.

This book could have been written by Jefferson Davis himself. Damn them Yankees and their War of Northern Aggression. I stopped listening after about 90 minutes.

7 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • Generale
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Vincent Tume
  • 18/12/2008

The American Civil War Made Simple

Contrary to the title's suggestion, there's very little in this title than I would rank as Politically Incorrect. I would however recommend this audiobook unreservedly to anyone with even a passing interest in America's Civil War. The book is well written, divided neatly between battles and personalities and well read.

42 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • Generale
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Richard Carrillo
  • 05/06/2021

perfumed caca

author says slavery not a big deal. so much bull poop presented to ignore that slavery evil, says north violated original deal which included slavry.watch step in reading, wear appropriate gear as this stink is heavy.

5 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • Generale
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Alex N
  • 28/10/2021

Lost Cause tripe in book form

Confederate propaganda at its finest. Surprised it’s so high up in the audible list. This book is just a bunch of lost cause talking points, cherry picking and skewing historical facts and documents, so if that’s your thing go for it, otherwise I wouldn’t recommend this book.

4 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • Generale
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Earl Featherston
  • 17/06/2021

Critique

Overall, this is one of the best documented books I have read or listened to. Based on a lifetime of interest and study of the American Civil War, I find the information in this book to be historically correct and truthful with few exceptions. Those with preconceived viewpoints regarding this event may consider it to be Pro South. I believe any library would benefit from its inclusion. Everything I’ve read concerning the key leaders of this war is inline with the author’s statements. I would recommend this book to anyone who would like to become better informed regarding the war between the states.

4 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Douglas C. Bates
  • 21/06/2011

Do Two Wrongs Make a Right?

American history suffers from two great stains: Slavery and the Civil War/War Between the States/War of Southern Succession/War of Northern Aggression. What name you choose reflects your conclusion about the war. Perhaps the Europeans have it best. They call it the "American War."

Most war history is not only the victor's history, but it is also colored by the result of the war, which can obscure the causes of the war. This is the author's main argument: that the war to preserve the Union has been recast as the war to end slavery, thus making the war a noble cause. The war indeed did end slavery, but its causes and the sentiments of the participants were far more complex. The exploration of this complexity is the politically incorrect aim of the book: That while slavery was of course immoral, so too was this war -- perhaps even more so. And without this war, slavery may have ended in a manner far better for everyone, including the slaves.

In the victor's history the loser is vilified. Among these villains we have a large proportion of people who were highly regarded prior to the war, and even after the war, including the grandsons of many of the country's founding fathers. What motivated these noble countrymen? What motivated the Union leaders? The answers do not correspond with a politically correct noble war to end slavery. The answers point to a stain in American history as dark as the stain of slavery.

While it can be said that this book is about the war from the Confederate point of view, it's really about the war from a point of view that considers many moral issues other than just slavery. If you are open to exploring this complexity, you will enjoy this book.

38 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • Generale
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Gerard
  • 17/04/2017

Total disappointment.

Horribly disappointing. Author is clearly pro confederate, makes informational mistakes, interjects his own opinion as fact and is most definitely a idolizer of Robert E. Lee. Anyone listening to this book should also listen to The Myth of the Lost Cause by an author named Bonekemper.

25 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 02/07/2019

More than slightly biased

Overall, this book gives a very good picture of the Civil War. That being said, this work is terminally slanted to the southern cause. The 'Books Yankess Dont Want You to Read' segments are entertaining even if purposefully provocative. Calling Gone With the Wind 'historically accurate' is absolute lunacy. You would be hard pressed to find a more inaccurate and idealized book on life in the antebellum south. Lee is practically worshiped as semi-divine and the author sounds like he is slobbering over Lee rather than simply pointing out his virtues. This book could have been much better if it was not pushing the lost cause narrative from beginning to end.

5 persone l'hanno trovata utile

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  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Bill Atkinson
  • 27/08/2021

Eye opening

An excellent book to add balance to the normal story. Also a great insight to the key players

3 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 12/07/2021

An eye-opener

History is usually written by the victors, it’s been said, and that certainly seems true of the American Civil War. This book, however, gives a different perspective and calls into question many of the accepted (Yankee) preconceptions.
The Southern states, we learn, had a strong case under the constitution for seceding from the Union, and Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation of 1863, which didn’t in fact free any slaves, flew in the face of the Supreme Court decision six years earlier which ruled that slavery was legal in all US territories.
This book provides valuable balance to those with a blue rather than grey standpoint. A must read.

3 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • Generale
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Rogtan
  • 02/05/2018

Certainly Not PC

A partisan trot around the ACW. Revealing and annoying by turns. Difficult not to listen to every damned word.

2 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • Generale
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Ludwig van El
  • 16/04/2022

I quite liked it

I'm not an expert on the civil war, so cannot judge its accuracy, but it seemed to be fairly impartial (but at the same time, aware of biases and the told this plays in the current political discourse)

1 persona l'ha trovata utile