The Last Caudillo

Alvaro Obregón and the Mexican Revolution
Letto da: Chris Snelgrove
Durata: 7 ore e 25 min
Categorie: Storia, Altri Paesi
Dopo 30 giorni EUR 9,99/mese

Sintesi dell'editore

The Last Caudillo presents a brief biography of the life and times of General Alvaro Obregon, along with new insights into the Mexican Revolution and authoritarian rule in Latin America. Features a succinct biography of the life and times of a fascinating figure in Mexico's revolutionary past.

Represents the most analytical and up-to-date study of caudillo/military strongman rule.

Sheds new light on the networks and discourse practices that support rulers such as the Castros in Cuba and Hugo Chavez in Venezuela, and the emergence of modern Mexico.

Offers new insights into the role of leadership, the nature of revolution, and the complex forces that helped shape modern Mexico.

©2011 Jurgen Buchenau (P)2013 Audible Ltd

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  • Generale
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Heribert Von Feilitzsch
  • 20/03/2020

Revolution or Return to Status Quo?

This book is very well researched and offers a new perspective on the Mexican Revolution. Many Mexicans 100 years after the bloody Civil War are struggling with the question of whether the Revolution fundamentally changed life in Mexico. Dr. Buchenau says, it depends. In a detailed analysis not only of Obregon but also his fellow Sonorans the question of which direction they took the revolution looms large. Obregon became a strongman, a caudillo in the tradition of Santa Anna 100 years before. The book is a great read and the conclusion I leave up to the reader to enjoy.

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  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • L Minnema
  • 12/10/2016

Unfortunately Snelgrove reads like a machine gun

Unfortunately, though clear Snelgrove reads like a monotonous and penetrative machine gun but the analysis itself is excellent