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Sintesi dell'editore

One of the world’s greatest novelists, Leo Tolstoy was also the author of a number of superb short stories, one of his best known being “The Kreutzer Sonata.” This macabre story involves the murder of a wife by her husband. It is a penetrating study of jealousy as well as a piercing complaint about the way in which society educates men and women in matters of sex - a serious condemnation of the mores and attitudes of the wealthy, educated class.

Leo Tolstoy (1828–1910) was born in Russia. His parents, who died when he was young, were of noble birth. He served in the army in the Caucasus and Crimea, where he wrote his first stories. He is especially known for his masterpieces, War and Peace (1869) and Anna Karenina (1877).

Public Domain (P)2012 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

Cosa pensano gli ascoltatori di The Kreutzer Sonata

Valutazione media degli utenti
Generale
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Lettura
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Storia
  • 3 out of 5 stars
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Recensioni - seleziona qui sotto per cambiare la provenienza delle recensioni.

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  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    4 out of 5 stars
  • T R Barrett
  • 22/05/2020

An in-depth first-person story of a man's psyche.

Simon Prebble (The Narrator) has delivered some great narrations over the years including some other works by Leo Tolstoy and Fyodor Dostoyevsky, and The Kreutzer Sonata definitely lives up to his standards!

The Kreutzer Sonata is a slower paced novel compared to some of Leo Tolstoy other works. However, this is an interesting insight on a man's psyche as the protagonist recounts his entire life up to the moment he murders his wife in a jealous rage.

Should you listen to the book? Yes, but just be aware of what type of book this is before you purchase. The novella was published in 1889, and was promptly censored by the Russian authorities, and even Theodore Roosevelt called Tolstoy a "sexual moral pervert" because of this novel.

2 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Cody A. Connell
  • 06/04/2021

so good!

nice and short, very well read. a great story about love, jealousy, and revenge. and the human condition.

1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • Generale
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Tim Martin
  • 25/05/2020

Dark polemic

Less a narrative, more a 3.5 hour dark polemic on love, sex, marriage and murder. Well written, well narrated (Prebble is one of the best), but this purchase was not my cup of chai.

1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • Generale
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Darwin8u
  • 02/02/2019

Love, Marriage, Family:: Wine, Women, Music

"Love, marriage, family,—all lies, lies, lies."
- Leo Tolstoy, The Krutzer Sonata

First, let me start this review by stating I think Anna Karenina might just be a perfect novel. So, I love Tolstoy. War and Peace, also amazes me and easily belongs on the list of Great World Novels. But 'The Kreutzer Sonata' plays like the writings of an over-indulged, philosophically-stretched, cranky, Fundamentalist older man. It is the sad, second wife to Anna Karenina*. That said, I enjoyed the structure. It is basically a man, Pozdnyshev, discussing his feelings on marriage, morality, and family on a train ride with some strangers. During this discussion he admits that in a jealous rage he once killed his wife (and was later aquited).

The story was censored briefly in 1890 (its censorship was later overturned), but that didn't stop Theodore Roosevelt calling Tolstoy a "sexual moral pervert". The novel does allude to wanking, immorality, adultery, abortion, etc. Which is funny, because the whole premise of the book is to rage against our moral failings. In a later piece Tolstoy wrote (Lesson of the"The Kreutzer Sonata") defending the novella, he basically explained his views:

1. Men are basically immoral perverts with the opposite sex when young. Society and families wink at their dissoluteness.
2. The poetic/romantic ideal of "falling in love" has had a detrimental impact on morality.
3. The birth of children has lost its pristine significance and the family has been degraded even in the "modern" view of marriage.
4. Children are being raised NOT to grow into moral adults, but to entertain their parents. They are seen as entertainments of the family.
5. Romatic ideas of music, art, dances, food, etc., has contributed and fanned the sexcual vices and diseases of youth.
6. The best years (youth) of our lives are spent trying to get our "freak on" (my term, not Count Tolstoy's). That period would be better spent not chasing tail, butserving one's country, science, art, or God.
7. Chasity and celibacy are to be admired and marriage and sex should be avoided. If we were really "Christian" we would not "bump uglies" (again, my term not the Count's).

It might seem like I am warping Tolstoy's argument a bit, but really I am not. I think the best response to Tolstoy came in 1908 at a celebration of Tolstoy's 80th* from G.K. Chesterton (not really a big libertine; big yes, libertine no):

"Tolstoy is not content with pitying humanity for its pains: such as poverty and prisons. He also pities humanity for its pleasures, such as music and patriotism. He weeps at the thought of hatred; but in The Kreutzer Sonata he weeps almost as much at the thought of love. He and all the humanitarians pity the joys of men." He went on to address Tolstoy directly: "What you dislike is being a man. You are at least next door to hating humanity, for you pity humanity because it is human”

* There are even a couple lines that seem to borrow scenes from, or allude to, Anna Karenina:
"throw myself under the cars, and thus finish everything."
"I was still unaware that ninety-nine families out of every hundred live in the same hell, and that it cannot be otherwise. I had not learned this fact from others or from myself. The coincidences that are met in regular, and even in irregular life, are surprising."
** Which, if the backward math works, means Kreutzer Sonata was written/published when Tolstoy was in his early 60s.

3 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Anonymous User
  • 22/07/2021

Excellent performance! ⭐️

Wow, this is possibly the best audiobook performance I've heard. It all sounded so natural and his voice held so much emotion. Excellent job from Simon Prebble ✨

  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Amber S.
  • 23/06/2021

Best reading EVER!

The story is, of course, extraordinary. The reading is, by far, the most engaging i have ever heard!

  • Generale
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Tyson Escoto
  • 23/05/2021

Not a good Intro to Tolstoy

I mean, It’s not a novel- the “setting” and “characters” are just an excuse to make you suffer through the pontifical rant of a sociopath. So either it’s a meta criticism of monkish, hyper-religious beliefs, or Tolstoy is a nut.

Narrator is decent but poorly edited as the volume often fluctuates.

  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Silentsiren
  • 21/05/2021

Heartrending

Incredibly emotional narrative read superbly by Simon Prebble. Highly recommended, but bring your hankies. You’ll need them.

  • Generale
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    1 out of 5 stars
  • C. Martini
  • 08/04/2021

Strikes A Dissonant Chord

The narrator was excellent. I find no fault with him.

In this work, the beauty and wisdom of Tolstoy's earlier novels is lost, replaced by bitterness and fanaticism. He is eager to blame women and society for his own weaknesses and inconsistencies. My deepest condolences to his wife.

I will find it difficult to revisit other works by Tolstoy that I have enjoyed in the past. I find many of the ideas expressed in this novella to be unforgivable.

  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Alvin Bowen
  • 02/04/2021

Phenomenal!

Fantastic book and great performance by the reader. Tolstoy's grasp of the human condition and understanding of the concepts of marital love and jealousy are more than noteworthy. Every experienced married couple will easily identify with this couple, recently married (5 years or less) are dealing with the problems now - hopefully with different solutions. Modern teenagers, especially females, should read the first sections to learn the consequences of clothing choices.