Ascolta ora gratuitamente con il tuo abbonamento Audible

9,99 € /mese

9,99 EUR/mese dopo i primi 30 giorni. Cancelli quando vuoi
Ottieni accesso illimitato a questo titolo e a una raccolta di oltre 60.000 altri titoli.
Ascolta quando e dove vuoi, anche senza connessione.
Nessun impegno. Cancella in qualsiasi momento.

Sintesi dell'editore

Detective fans of all races and creeds, of all tastes and fancies will delight in the exploits of this wise and whimsical padre. Father Brown’s powers of detection allow him to sit beside the immortal Holmes, but he is also "in all senses a most pleasantly fascinating human being", according to American crime novelist Rufus King. You will be enchanted by the scandalously innocent man of the cloth, with his handy umbrella, who exhibits such uncanny insight into ingeniously tricky human problems.

This collection of 12 mysteries solved by Father Brown includes: "The Blue Cross", "The Secret Garden", "The Queer Feet", "The Flying Stars", "The Invisible Man", "The Honour of Israel Gow", "The Wrong Shape", "The Sins of Prince Saradine", "The Hammer of God", "The Eye of Apollo", "The Sign of the Broken Sword", and "The Three Tools of Death".

©1933 G. K. Chesterton (P)1992 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

“G. K. Chesterton’s tales [are] of the unassuming Catholic priest who claims that his work at the confessional (where he has to do ‘next to nothing but hear men’s real sins’) puts him in an excellent position to solve the bizarre crimes that come his way in pre–First World War England…. The unassuming cleric, whose humble conviction that his God will eventually triumph over the souls of even the most evil of criminals, is the quiet but insistent heartbeat of these unusual exercises in detective fiction.” ( Sunday Times, London)

Cosa pensano gli ascoltatori di The Innocence of Father Brown

Valutazione media degli utenti

Recensioni - seleziona qui sotto per cambiare la provenienza delle recensioni.

Non ci sono recensioni disponibili
Ordina per:
Filtra per:
  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • John
  • 05/03/2019

A Very Knowledgeable Innocence

Listen to this one just for the language, the way Chesterton can evolve an observation about an everyday object into an observation about society or even civilization. Like all the Father Brown stories, these are written by a mind not uncommon at the time; a mind that operated on several different planes at once: the aesthetic, the religious, the cultural, the historic. Those differing angles of perspective then merged into prose that illuminated whatever it took under consideration as brilliantly as any poet.

A passing familiarity with the history of the time is helpful, French politics in general and the Dreyfus affair in particular. Some of these stories have later literary reverberations, “The Queer Feet”, being the story Lady Marchmain reads aloud in Brideshead Revisited. It is also my favorite in this collection; a poignant picture of how God’s mercy can reach us, in spite of everything we do to avoid Him.

By now I’ve come to realize that Frederick Davidson (aka David Case) is a deal breaker for many. We either love him or hate him. I love him; his suave, knowing delivery is the perfect vehicle for Chesterton’s witty, urbane and, ultimately, profound playfulness.

7 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Donna M. Yuengling
  • 19/07/2018

Character Development

I am familiar with the Father Brown stories as many are from the two TV shows. This was so much better seeing the characters develop

4 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Katherine
  • 17/06/2015

Charming

Delightful stories about a detect e who solves intriguing mysteries using his intuitive, experienced knowledge of people

5 persone l'hanno trovata utile

  • Generale
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • J-me
  • 12/07/2021

Disappointed by the narration

The stories are excellent. I’m familiar with a number of them. However the narrator is careless and appears to forget that he is reading for an audience. Very annoying. This book is included in my membership or I would have returned it very quickly.

  • Generale
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    3 out of 5 stars
  • materialist
  • 12/07/2021

Period pieces

Closer to Sherlock Holmes than to the later closed room/English village/grande dames of English mystery: imperturbable little Father Brown who notices everything and interprets the human heart through the lens of its relationship to spirituality. These murders, gruesome and described with considerable relish, are situated in a society only beginning to wrench itself away from Victorianism, and there is none of the questioning of the class structure and social roles that mark later, post World War I, mysteries. Mostly, Chesterton seemed to use the stories as ways to comment on religion. (He was a convert to Catholicism, which in his England was still a fraught thing to be.) Narrator was a bit too blasé for my taste; only his Father Brown voice was gentle and sweet, but every so often the softness took on an almost creepy quality. The French accents were annoying but perhaps inevitable.

  • Generale
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    3 out of 5 stars
  • squishy
  • 07/04/2021

Narrator, ugh!

Slow, tedious with occasional witty exchanges but bad narration was just to much to stay long enough to find them. Grating voice.

  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • DM
  • 06/02/2021

never knew these stories before now, Fun

good clean fun. very enjoyable. the good father is very quick witted and observant. interesting what he chooses to do with the criminals

  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Debbie
  • 06/01/2021

Quiet, Contemplating Father Brown

The short stories included in this title are quaint and perfectly portray Father Brown to the listeners. Author, G.K. Chesterton was born in 1874, at a time way before political correctness, and died in 1936. There are a couple instances (only one or two) when a person might be insulted by language that is clearly not acceptable (then or now), but was the norm for the times. Please do not let this dissuade you from listening. In many ways these stories of Father Brown are better than the TV series, with nuances that are missed on the screen. His friendship with a former criminal, his practice of almost always keeping to himself anything that would hurt other people, and his association with atheists, liars, and others sorts that most clergy steer clear of. Yet always being clear that faith in God is the better path . . . but doing so in the most understated way . . . quietly. I'm looking forward to listening to the rest in the series. Father Brown is good for the soul.

  • Generale
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Erica
  • 05/12/2020

Love Father Brown

Narrators voice is like finger nails across a black board. Not pleasant to hear at all.

  • Generale
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Volunteer
  • 03/10/2020

Definitely “of it’s time”

The stories are well-constructed and the mysteries mostly very satisfying, but there are many, many parts that are shockingly, disgustingly racist. Chesterton saw people of other races as subhuman and inherently evil. If you are a fan of the Father Brown tv series (as I am), then it may be worth a listen for the interest in hearing the original, but thank heaven the tv series is far removed from Chesterton’s ideology.

Ordina per:
Filtra per:
  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Stephen
  • 13/04/2013

Intriguing

I have to say I came to these stories imagining a conservative, mildly entertaining listen. My expectations were immediately undermined by the structure of the first story, which is quite odd and unexpected. Each story has a crime and solution, and they are all held together by the self-depricating Father Brown, whose ability to understand the darker sides of human nature is formed more through is own friendship with criminals than insight from God. Themes and another main character, whom again unexpectedly evolves through the stories, give the whole book a satisfyingly complete feeling. Father Brown, the character, can be quite irritating (though I have a feeling this may be intentional on Chesterton's part), but there is a strand of humour and a lightness to the stories, despite their surprisingly brutal crimes. There is an odd clash of conservatism and liberalism in the stories which I found intriguing. It took me a while to get used to Frederick Davidson's voice (which some may find an acquired taste) but I soon came to really enjoy his reading, and especially enjoyed his use of voices for different characters. If you are new to Father Brown, like me, I really hope you enjoy this book. I am certainly going to listen to or read more.

1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • Generale
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Ms. E. Morgan
  • 25/08/2018

A Great Mixture of Crime, Comedy and Compassion

The First Father Brown Short Story Compilation:

Father Brown is an endearing character who is able to use intelligence, experience humour and compassion in the detection of crime and mystery.

The narrator; Frederick Davidson is an acquired taste but it does not much detract from the stories.

Please be aware that this book was complied in 1911, so some of the language and opinions are a bit out of date / archaic. It also (unsurprisingly for a book featuring a catholic priest) is is written from unashamedly positive Christian and Catholic viewpoint.

Full Story Listing:

1) The Blue Cross - Father Brown meet 'Flambo' for the first time.
2) The Secret Garden - Classic 'Country House' murder mystery
3) The Queer Feet - Queer as in strange; mystery at an exclusive restaurant.
4) The Flying Stars - Pantomime, family drama and theft
5) The Invisible Man - Deadly love rivals
6) The Honour of Israel Gow - Mystery at a Scottish Estate
7) The Wrong Shape - Murder or Suicide?
8) The Sins of Prince Saradine - Revenge, Intrigue, boats
9) The Hammer of God - Mystery Murder Weapon
10) The Eye of Apollo - Religion or cult?
11) The Sign of the Broken Sword - Military Mystery
12) The Three Tools of Death - Challenge your assumptions

I thoroughly enjoyed the book and have re-'read' it many times, I think story 11 is the best.

  • Generale
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Elizabeth
  • 01/08/2013

Just OK. Not super keen on the narrators voice.

Having recently seen the BBC adaption of Fr Brown 2013 I thought I would give the original stories a listen; I was under no illusion that the TV version would be the same as the author had intended. That said I was a little disappointed. The stories do ramble a little and are constructed in an outdated and wordy form of speech which can take some getting used to. It's only to be expected when you consider the date of publication. I personally didn't find the narrator easy to listen to, that's just my little foible. I would be interested if the Beeb did an audible dramatization. Until such a time, I'll not bother with the other books in the series.

2 persone l'hanno trovata utile