Learning to Eat Soup with a Knife

Counterinsurgency Lessons from Malaya and Vietnam
Letto da: John Pruden
Durata: 8 ore e 46 min
Categorie: Storia, XX Secolo
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Sintesi dell'editore

Invariably, armies are accused of preparing to fight the previous war. In Learning to Eat Soup with a Knife, Lieutenant Colonel John A. Nagl—a veteran of both Operation Desert Storm and the conflict in Iraq—considers the now crucial question of how armies adapt to changing circumstances during the course of conflicts for which they are initially unprepared. Through the use of archival sources and interviews with participants in both engagements, Nagl compares the development of counterinsurgency doctrine and practice in the Malayan Emergency from 1948 to 1960 with what developed in the Vietnam War from 1950 to 1975.

In examining these two events, Nagl argues that organizational culture is key to the ability to learn from unanticipated conditions, a variable which explains why the British army successfully conducted counterinsurgency in Malaya and why the American army failed to do so in Vietnam, treating the war instead as a conventional conflict. Nagl concludes that the British army, because of its role as a colonial police force and the organizational characteristics created by its history and national culture, was better able to quickly learn and apply the lessons of counterinsurgency during the course of the Malayan Emergency.

With a new preface reflecting on the author’s combat experience in Iraq, Learning to Eat Soup with a Knifeis a timely examination of the lessons of previous counterinsurgency campaigns that will be hailed by both military leaders and interested civilians.

Lieutenant Colonel John A. Nagl, US Army (Ret.), is a military assistant to the deputy secretary of defense. He led a tank platoon in the First Cavalry Division in Operation Desert Storm, taught national security studies at West Point’s Department of Social Sciences, and served as the operations officer of Task Force 1-34 Armor with the First Infantry Division in Khalidiyah, Iraq.

©2002 John A. Nagl. Preface 2005 by John A. Nagl. Foreword 2005 by Peter J. Schoomaker. Additional material by the University of Chicago Press (P)2012 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

“[A] highly regarded counterinsurgency manual.” ( Washington Post)
“Colonel Nagl’s book is one of a half dozen Vietnam histories—most of them highly critical of the US military in Vietnam—that are changing the military’s views on how to fight guerrilla wars…The tome has already had an influence on the ground in Iraq.” ( Wall Street Journal)
Learning to Eat Soup with a Knife (a title taken from T. E. Lawrence—himself no slouch in guerrilla warfare) is a study of how the British Army succeeded in snuffing out the Malayan insurgency between 1948 and 1960—and why the Americans failed in Vietnam…It is helping to transform the American military in the face of its greatest test since Vietnam.” ( Times (London))

Cosa pensano gli ascoltatori di Learning to Eat Soup with a Knife

Valutazione media degli utenti

Non ci sono recensioni disponibili
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Filtra per:
  • Generale
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Natalie
  • 06/07/2016

How to make military action and political effort match

A must read for every officer, civil servant or educated amateur who searches for a deeper understanding of COIN.
This book is more important than ever for those dealing with ISIS, Al Nuzra, Al-Qaeda, etc. in places like Lybia, Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan but also for countering separatism in Eastern Ukraine.

3 people found this helpful

  • Generale
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    4 out of 5 stars
  • James Wood
  • 18/09/2018

Eurocentric

This is a very neccessary subject of study and there were good observations noted. Most importantly the need to adapt and be always learning as an organization. I believe the examples were primarily from a Eurocentric perspective on warfare.

1 person found this helpful

  • Generale
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Utente anonimo
  • 25/09/2020

Interesting topic but dry

I was looking for something that went more into the tactics involved in counter insurgency and their application. This book is more of a high level overview of the development of tactics without much time wasted on what those tactics were.

  • Generale
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • K. Nwagba
  • 13/05/2020

Unique and Captivating

The book presents a good account of the British in Malaya and the US Army in Vietnam. John made an interesting comparism, intelligently relating the surface/visible differences to critical yet non-obvious factors such as organizational cultures. John describes generally, the behaviors of armies and the difficulty faced in changing an army’s doctrine. He also proffers solutions to assist in overcoming the challenges. Captivating read also. I recommend.

  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • edward sumerdon
  • 30/07/2019

Informative and sobering.

Nagle was ahead of the times. Thank goodness men like him, along with Generals Petraeus, Franks, Mattis and McChrystal. Along with Admiral McRaven. The right people at the right time. This book and the narrator were excellent.

  • Generale
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • James
  • 25/05/2018

Good for the car

Struggled to stay engaged despite the interesting topic, as the narrator was a bit flat. Would suggest reading The Best and Brightest first to get a deeper understand on the Vietnam story.

  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Jessica B
  • 23/09/2016

Great book - read by Siri's brother

The lessons from Vietnam and the Malayan conflict are clear and very well put together. I was surprised at the end that the book was actually narrated by a human - I could have sworn it was a robot.

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  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Ms T. Evans
  • 29/12/2019

A critique of our ingrained institutional optimism

Almost 20 years old, yet a timeless alarm for all. Japan's Miyamoto Musashi presaged the same. is our inability to learn is a natural pressure valve to the eventual unwieldiness of dominant orders? Nagl literally, in name and substance, hits the nail on the head. Understanding organisational learning is essential to our own evolution. His juxtaposition of the Malaya campaign and the Vietnam war is instrumental to say the least. Is his identification of what worked and whether it still exists prescient though of the continued fall of an empire?

  • Generale
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Copperfish
  • 03/05/2019

interesting counter insurgency theory

Interesting topic. Draws on many of the similar comparisons of the COIN of Malaya vs Vietnam but fails to highlight the massive differences such as physical geography the historical links of the parties involved in each conflict. This is a prime example of displaying statistics that suit your end goal. Overall the narrator was very clear and performed well. The story flowed well except for the statistics page where it would be better to physically see rather than to listen to them.