Building High Performance Teams

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If you're like most business leaders, you carry a huge work load. You spend hours preparing your production schedules and presentations, planning, and managing the staff. You know there are things you would really like to do with your business, but you just don't seem to have the time or energy to make those things happen. Well, what if I told you that it's possible to make those dreams a reality? And what if I also told you the most powerful tool that you need to make it happen is sitting right under your nose? You're even well aware of this tool already. You know it's there, but you've probably avoided it - and for some very good reasons. In fact, when I tell you what this tool is, you're probably going to smirk and say, "Yeah, right." That's because this tool is your staff. (If you're smirking right now, please keep reading, as you're about to discover how teams can help your dreams for your organization come alive.)All too often, teams have terrible reputations for inefficiency - and deservedly so. Our projects regularly get stagnated in team-centered red tape and inactivity. Inefficient teams are notorious for wasting time, creating conflict, playing politics, and fulfilling personal agendas. It's no wonder business leaders would rather do the work themselves than to entrust it to their staff. But it is imperative to remember that there are only so many hours in a day - and your staff is there to serve your needs. They just need to learn how! You can turn it all around and get awesome results from your staff-based teams. Your teams can learn to:

  • Have productive, energized meetings;
  • Have a team leader that understands leadership;
  • Have a team leader that molds and guides the process;
  • Have enough people to get the job done, but not so many that decision-making is difficult;
  • Have specific goals and action plans;
  • Get most of the work done between meetings;
  • Minimize conflict with clear goals, responsibilities, and accountabilities

©2011 Hugh Ballou (P)2011 Made for Success, Inc.

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