Arrowsmith

Letto da: John McDonough
Durata: 20 ore e 41 min
Dopo 30 giorni EUR 9,99/mese

Sintesi dell'editore

The son of a country doctor, Sinclair Lewis turned to writing instead of medicine. He won the Nobel Prize in 1930. Arrowsmith was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Literature. This is the story of a brilliant young man who dedicates his life to science, yet finds that corruption, not disease, is his greatest foe.

Martin Arrowsmith is fascinated by science and medicine. As a boy, he immerses himself in Gray’s Anatomy. In medical school, he soaks up knowledge from his mentor, a renowned bacteriologist. But soon he is urged to focus on politics and promotions rather than his research. Even as Martin progresses from doctor to public health official and noted pathologist, he still yearns to devote his time to pure science.

Published in 1924, this novel had a profound effect on the reading public. As an expose of professional greed and fraud, it was a call to scrutinize flawed medical practices. Now, through John McDonough’s vibrant narration, it is a truly notable audiobook.

Public Domain (P)2001 Recorded Books, LLC

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  • Generale
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Stephen
  • 08/09/2013

Arrowsmith - The Classic Book, Not the Band

Book: In general, I do not comment on classics. However, I found the story interesting since it draws from the history in the US from 100 years ago: Pre-WWI, midwest, industrialization of the economy, the movement of most of the population from the farm to the city, etc - all the changes - economic, political, social, etc. I liked it but if you were looking for fast moving book, this is not it. However, if want to see changes in personalities and slices of social groups, it is interesting with great wording and character development. I sure it won the Noble Prize for Literature for its social-political aspect, in part, but it is a very good piece of literature.

Performance: The reader was very good. In time, I forgot there was reader and toward the end of the book the reader acted some of the characters well out.

5 people found this helpful

  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Kenneth West
  • 23/05/2015

Precursor to Rand's The Fountainhead

It's no coincidence that Ayn Rand read many of Sinclair Lewis's novels, especially Arrowsmith. The theme of Arrowsmith is staying true to oneself, to one's very soul. Unlike Howard Roark in The Fountainhead, Martin Arrowsmith has not achieved the certainty of Roark, yet he fights throughout the book to not be a second-hander (to use Rand's term). He succeeds, but it takes the length of the book to find out for sure.

Wonderful book!

4 people found this helpful

  • Generale
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Pamela
  • 05/06/2016

Definitely a book of its time

While this book touches on many issues faced by doctors today, this tale is very reflective of the early 20th century. The training, social standing and expectations of doctors have changed drastically. Imagine your physician attempting to remember the exact dosage to treat a contagious disease or having to stand and watch helplessly while a child dies of a fever. The research and other resources available to doctors today make many of the situations almost laughable, if they were not so frightening.

But each doctor still faces the pulls of income generation and cost-efficient care, of catering to the wishes of demanding patients and taking the familiar treatment route because the new ones put the reputation of the doctor at risk.

However, there are many reflection of the gender and race based assumptions predominant at the time. I try my best to read a book in the context of the time it was written, but when the only two girls in the "medic school" are dismissed as laughing or hysterical when faced with the rigors of dissection class and when the newest member of the President's cabinet is the Secretary of Health and Eugenics I can not help but cringe.

Martin Arrowsmith is not the least likeable. I admire his dedication, but even the purest scientist is more effective when he collaborates and communicates with others. He is hardheaded to the point of undermining his own work. Most men of his type sink quickly and toil away in bitter oblivion. Imagine how much more he could have achieved if he had kept his mouth shut on occasion and not quit so many positions in a snit. The Arrowsmith of the book would be lucky to hold a drudge job in a basic lab.

I found the section near the end where Arrowsmith had to deal with the plague outbreak while maintaining the control group of patients as expendable guinea pigs the most relevant. Researchers and drug companies both face the competing demands of making promising new treatments available to patients, exploiting new offerings for profits and ensuring those treatments are safe and effective. Sadly, the profit motive wins too often, both in our times and in Arrowsmith's.

2 people found this helpful

  • Generale
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    3 out of 5 stars
  • P. Giorgio
  • 14/01/2014

Boring but readable

So this kid from the hinterlands decides to become a doctor. He goes through the trials and tribs of youth, early love, rejection. He hitches his academic wagon to the wrong stars on occasion. He finds the right woman who supports him and his quest for a medical degree and a position to work in science. He fails miserably more than once. He capitulates to corporate greed, the woman's parents, the expectations of society all before he wakes up --too late-- and has to start all over again.

If this was a jab at the education of a medical professional, it seems weak today. The writing was strong, the characters well defined, their foibles and power well explored and delineated. Poor Martin Arrowsmith, however, was drawn without much spine, and less imagination than his costars.

Not sure why this is a "classic" except for its year, and the fact that Sinclair Lewis also wrote Elmer Gantry, but it is an adequate portrait of early 20th century, pre-WWII America. There are some attacks at militarism, at corporate medical practices, at academia, etc., but it's not a diatribe and it is also not a deep read.

I am taking on Elmer Gantry later, but I feel I've already seen into that book through Lewis' sweep of American immorality in this book. Elmer Gantry SHOULD be preachy; Arrowsmith was as well.

2 people found this helpful

  • Generale
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Tamara
  • 11/11/2018

Tough to push through

This was not an easy title to stick with. My mind kept wandering off. If you’re willing to do the work, you’ll find it satisfying in the end. I suppose in modern times it would be edited down to fit our shorter attention spans. It did not wow me, but it was okay. #depressing #Nostalgic #Midlifecrisis #tagsgiving #sweepstakes

1 person found this helpful

  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • jane milrod
  • 17/12/2015

Classic and elegant

Oh! The craftsmanship of this tale. Felt transported to turn of the century America and did not want this to ever end.

1 person found this helpful

  • Generale
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Forrest
  • 26/02/2012

Still Relevant

I am going to medical school next year and was told to read this book by several people. It was startling that so many of the issues that face the modern doctor had already been clearly outlined almost 90 years ago. This book was particularly interesting to me after reading several nonfiction books describing medical science in the same era like "The Demon under the Microscope" and "The Great Influenza". Although the moral dilemmas are complex and interesting, Lewis does not achieve that same complexity in his characters and their actions.

8 people found this helpful

  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Utente anonimo
  • 08/05/2020

Excellent emotions in the narration

Thanks a lot, enjoyed the listening! The narrator was reading with an extremely satisfying mild and beautiful pace.

  • Generale
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lettura
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    5 out of 5 stars
  • ThunderInTheSun
  • 16/10/2019

Bravo, Mr. McDonough!

This is a book my brother had to read when he was in the 11th or 12th grade. I was only in the 7th grade then but since it was a paperback he had to purchase, it laid around the house until I was in the 10th grade when I decided to read it.

Although this is one of Sinclair Lewis's best, the narrator Mr. McDonough, really made the characters come to life. I completely enjoyed his performances of all the characters as I did enjoy the novel itself. As a physician myself, I could appreciate the stress of nurturing both a personal and professional life.

That notwithstanding, Arrowsmith's humble beginnings are what strengthen him from the onslaught of his trials from his upward migration on the social ladder and playing politics, which he, as a man of science and a truth-seeker, despises immensely yet is compelled to partake due, in part, to his marriage to a wealthy debutante.

Nevertheless, his love for science/discovery is his real mistress that very often complicates and confounds his personal life. Arrowsmith struggles for a more grand purpose in his life yet all the while struggling with actually having a life, outside of his laboratory and his relationships with fellow physicians and other scientists, makes this story compelling on a variety of levels that Mr. S. Lewis pursues with repressed exploitation.

  • Generale
    4 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Storia
    4 out of 5 stars
  • FCD117
  • 23/08/2019

An Excellent Narration of A Very Good, But Lengthy Story

"Arrowsmith" is a lengthy, interesting, but at times slow moving novel. I enjoyed the novel, but needed to read it in steps as it became tedious at times. At other times it was very touching. I am very glad that I read it. Thus far my personal favorite novel by Sinclair Lewis is "Babbitt".

The actual audiobook narration, in terms of a performance, by John McDonough was particularly excellent. Thank You...